Katarina Brieditis
Current

Katarina Brieditis

A textile is never one-sided. It has a backside, a materiality and several dimensions. Inside the textile is the construction of bindings that brings one side to the other, locks in place and holds together. The construction itself can be seen as a metaphor for the fact that there is always another side to what we see and perceive. Every thread matters and has the possibility to change the whole construction. Repetitions clarifies and give character; something that could be useful, or alternatively, important to break.

One example of Katarina Brieditis’ point of departure is the knitted stitch that row after row binds itself, like a symbol of eternity. But so fragile. One dropped stitch and everything falls apart. The stitches build a textile where the back is dependent on the front. A two-sided coexistence, a "both-and", different but equally true.

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Petter Hellsing
Upcoming

Petter Hellsing

For his exhibition at Fiberspace, Petter Hellsing puts materials in focus and is looking for ways to let them speak based on their own premises. What can a conversation between man and material look like? The tool here becomes a transitional object, a tool that extends the body to the world and puts it in relation to other forces. The bodily action and the resistance in the material is crucial to reaching an understanding beyond the power of thought.

As Hellsing sees it, something has happened in the world and we are facing a renewed relationship to materials. It is no longer possible to regard the world around us as inanimate matter. Perhaps things have their own agenda. In any case, we can not ignore the ecological consequences of our lack of attentiveness. An honest encounter with materials awakens deep physical memories in most of us. A hand in sheep's wool, the weight of a stone or a knife's blade carving into wood, all bear the promise of creation that makes us greater as human beings. The making of an object is not just a relational human act, but the work of the hand is also an inward dialogue, between the maker, the viewer and the material.

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Annie Johansson
Upcoming

Annie Johansson

Annie Johansson’s artistic practice is concerned with finding the decisive moment when the materiality of the objects she creates reverberates within the body of the viewer, where the observation and contemplation of the art, congers a bodily experience. Johansson works intuitively, step by step, creating collaboration between her body and the material until the material has become its own body - an object. She works in dialogue with the nature of the material; how it behaves under the laws of gravity, how the room and the effects of light influence it. It is about the intimacy of textiles and how they convey a sense of humanity and physicality. She is in search for that which allows for an awareness of one’s body and one’s inner. Working with silk, wool and nylon, tufting is an important technique in Johansson’s work, born out of her longing to create in a more physical and hands-on way. A longing that is also about working in a large format and encountering something bigger than one’s own body, a thought that textiles can be intimate while being monumental.

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Thomas Magnusson
Past

Thomas Magnusson

With his pictures, Thomas Magnusson wants to try to reflect the inner and outer world, their expanse and how they can relate to each other. A perambulation between different, strong colours and layers of appendages. The intense yellow, dark blue, red, pink ... Threads. One can see it present but not clearly explained. The passage of time and transformation, the changes of the weather and light, the body of the air.

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Dominique + Pettersson Preutz
Past

Dominique + Pettersson Preutz

The project -visual-illusion-confusion- is a collaboration between the artists Ida Pettersson Preutz and Matilda Dominique. In conversations and questions between Ida and Matilda, between threads and fabric pieces, contrasts and patterns, processes are intertwined and form a unit. The common denominator and point of departure is the shadow weave, which they explore together and each in their own way to create new rooms with optical illusions.

In the project, they are examining the potential of shadow fabrics to go from small-scale designs in the home to monumental and architectural. With their work they want to shape the traditional weaving pattern in different scales, techniques and materials in relation to room and body. The visual expression together with the structure and structure of the pattern become important building blocks.

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Elisabeth Brenner Remberg
Past

Elisabeth Brenner Remberg

The braided, knotted or sewn objects on the nets in Elisabeth's art pieces are geometrically constructed, often changing as the light shifts, in reflex bands and fiber optics. One sculptural piece made of spun linen, the motif is an interpretation of South African women's hairstyles and complicated braiding systems. Like many of her "network compositions", it has a three-dimensional effect. Elisabeth lets the stringent form language speak. She is an artist who loves black and white and gives waste material new features and aesthetic appeal. It is important to see the possibilities and the beauty of the little thing!

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EASY PIECE COLLABORATORY
Past

EASY PIECE COLLABORATORY

Can one garment save the world?
Easy Piece was born out of fashion frustration, when Runa Juhanisdotter decided to make a pattern of Easy Piece open source and invite people to a creative, experimental collaboration, investigating how fashion could be transformed. Easy Piece is beyond fashion and trends. Inclusive, honest and friendly. Based on one simple pattern that can be tweaked and hacked to boost everybody’s personal preferences, without disrespecting lives and resources on the planet. Processes that unite, not divide, and create meaning and common prosperity.

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Olsson + Serning
Past

Olsson + Serning

Volume of pattern
An exhibition is about a play with pattern in the gallery space where Caroline Olsson and Lina Serning strive to maintain the hand-drawn and the hand's creative expression. Their material palette consists of ink and brush patterns that are applied in various ways in the room and to different volumes. The duo, consisting of an interior designer/architect and a scenographer/costume designer, work with body and volume in relation to interior spaces. They have many common points of reference, but different ways of approaching a project. Caroline works with the human body in relation to the rooms that are designed. She also creates furniture that together interact with the room to illustrate the overall interior design concept's story and function. Lina works with the human body in relation to the stage room, creates costumes for the body that together with the room co-operate to illustrate the play's story.

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Råw Projects pop-up shop
Past

Råw Projects pop-up shop

Through Raw Projects, Emma Dahlqvist and Sanna Bodén investigate the possibilities of working with plant pigments for dyeing fabrics in a circular system by refining waste from local restaurants and industries. Everyday, food and waste is thrown away from restaurants, grocery stores and industries. Waste that could in fact serve as resources if, with the help of the design process, they were refined into something new - in this case natural textile dyeing pigments. This pop-up shop, open only during two weekends, showcases unique garments designed by Emma and Sanna, that have been dyed using discarded roses, red onion skins, among other things.

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Kristina Skantze
Past

Kristina Skantze

Non-Mythological Creatures
Kristina Skantze is a Stockholm based artist. Through careful and persistent hand stitching she sculpts human-like fabric beings. The seams that shape the body parts are important and appear as lines, scars stretching the skin of cloth. Textile flesh shaped by millions of visible and invisible stitches, subdued pastel silk jersey and polyester padding. Experiences are sewn into the bodies, into the artist’s own bodily memory as well as into the limbs of the figures. Visible but secretive, shaping their individual personalities. Distorted bodies have always fascinated Kristina. In the project Non-Mythological Creatures she is searching for new shapes and expressions through mixing human and animal features. What kind of emotions can be recognised in these creatures? Are they part of our world or do they exist in their own time and space?

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