Carl Cyrén
Past

Carl Cyrén

Carbon Craft is an on-going exploration by Carl Cyrén of knitted carbon fibers meeting molten glass, of control meeting randomness, relocating carbon fibers from the high-tech world of racing cars and aeronautics to the intuitive world of craft. The skill of the glassblowers at the Glass Factory is challenged by the self-willed interaction between air bubbles and stitches: threads that stretch apart and pull together; glass that expands through the spaces in between, bulging to almost bursting point; and glass that is restraint by the tightness of the knitted web. Organic structures take shape, solidifying into glossy sculptures, reflecting the light and the space in the vicinity.

Carl Cyrén, (born 1989 in Sweden) graduated with a master’s degree in design from Konstfack in 2016 and considers himself more an industrial designer than an artist, producing his pieces in collaboration with skilled craftsmen. Fiberspace is pleased to be hosting this, his first solo exhibition. All the pieces are brand new, produced exclusively for this show. Carl has, in addition to working with white and clear glass that he has earlier worked with, experimented with coloured and transparent glass, creating some surprising effects.

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Ulrika Mårtensson
Past

Ulrika Mårtensson

Through the work of the hand using textile materials and craft techniques, Ulrika aims to investigate how architecture can be given a textile embodiment, as an alternative to what architecture is generally considered to be. Her ambition is to investigate how the characteristics often associated with textiles, such as narrative storytelling, culture-bearing and tactility can contribute new insights. Can architecture be textile? Can textile be architecture?

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Malin Bobeck
Past

Malin Bobeck

Malin Bobeck is a textile designer and artist, 29 years old, based in Stockholm. Her works currently evolve around light emitting textiles, specializing in weaving with optical fibers. In December 2015 she was awarded the “Encouragement of research” from the Sten A Olsson foundation, with the motivation: "For those who are accustomed to thinking of the woven fabric as something quiet and controlled, the encounter with Malin Bobeck’s work will be bewildering. Her textiles careen, sparkle and switch between different moods. They arouse curiosity and invite us to be tactile. In her still young artistic practice, Malin Bobeck aims to create changing spatial structures in which the latest lighting and interactive technology is combined with handicraft. She is part of a broad movement in craft and design that combines traditional methods with contemporary technology, in an inquiring and inclusive way. Her approach rejuvenates the craft and also creates a new and exciting context for the achievements of engineering science."

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Karine Jollet
Past

Karine Jollet

“The Garden’s Voice” is an installation in 6 parts or variations on the title theme by French artist Karine Jollet. This is also her first Swedish exhibition and we hope the first of many to come. Karine Jollet is a soft-sculpture artist using white fabrics as her favorite medium.

“The Garden’s Voice” is presented for the first time in this format which was specifically conceived for Fiberspace Gallery. The title is taken from a long poem by Haris Metaxa, “Possessed” written in the context of the joint garden poetry and sculpture exhibition called “Bodies of Grace”. The two artists, poet and sculptor, produced and exhibited it for the first time in 2009 in a Parisian garden, nature being one of the muses.

This installation includes the poem itself, depicted in 15 suspended handkershiefs in pearl embroidery (“Possessed”), a suspended human figure capturing the garden’s voice (“Medium”), two suspended feet with roots (“Dance”), a mini-installation of two sculptures combined, one of a tunic with lungs embroidered on it and the other of two feet firmly on the ground (“Embodiment” and “Marcher - Walker”), a reclining woman connected to a flower (“Rêve de Fleur - Flower Power”) and a sculpture of a suspended human ear (“Hearing”).

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